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‘Unpretty Rapstar,’ crooked or boost to female Korean rappers?

Rap music in Korea has gained acceptance in recent years to the point where it’s earned space in mainstream culture, primarily through an increase in rap-focused reality shows. But while male hip-hop stars have begun becoming major players in Korea’s entertainment industry, women aren’t doing quite as well.

In the past, Korean rap has been filled with male artists. Women generally appeared only as members of OG hip-hop crews such as Uptown and Honey Family. Nowadays, we get to see more female rappers in Korea, but still very few compared with the hegemony of male rappers on charts, and awards and T.V. shows. But to say that Korea lacks good female MCs would be a false statement. So why aren’t they getting the treatment they deserve? Shows like Mnet’s Unpretty Rapstar highlight the issue.

Some contestants themselves are more problematic than others, but the larger evil is the show’s format rather than specific individuals. Unpretty Rapstar could be a platform for female empowerment, and instead, it appears just to be usurping it for ratings.


Also on KultScene: ‘Unpretty Rapstar’ is Sexist & Promotes Girl-On-Girl Hate

The first season aired in January 2015 and was not only a local sensation, but also appealed to audiences overseas. The second season aired in September 2015 and brought even more attention to more female rappers. The third season aired in July 2016, and ended up catching less attention for the quality of performances and moreso for forcing beefs between the contestants. Not that there wasn’t drama in the script of previous seasons; battles and diss tracks are a common thing in rap music and the hip-hop movement, but compelling women to take it more personally than they are willing to is a whole different thing.

In first season, for example, Tymee said multiple times that she had no problem with Jolly V and no desire to continue fighting her. But it was suggested through the show’s production that the two do so. Season two similarly did not waste opportunities to pit Heize and KittiB against each other on numerous occasions. Moreover, KittiB was constantly body shamed by the show for her curvier silhouette.

On the positive side, the show has contributed a lot to reveal unknown talents and gave more opportunities to female rappers who already had a solid career or were up-and-coming. However, the premise itself is problematic. It leads one to wonder whether a segregated space for women to rap in would be needed if they already had equal opportunities to showcase their work regardless of their gender. Women are able to appear on Show Me The Money, the male-dominated equivalent of Unpretty Rapstar, but few have made it to the final rounds.

Moreover, it’s not only the need for all-woman competition show that is questionable; the execution of the concept doesn’t help much either. This year’s season had less of a focus on the talent and experience of the contestants and instead veered towards focusing on and maximizing the drama between contestants. More often than not, it centered on their physical appearances — far more than it had during the previous two installments.

It is hard to take a show like this seriously when we see legends like Miryo (former member of hip-hop group Honey Family and current member of girl group Brown Eyed Girls) competing next to artists like Kassy, who is actually a singer that occasionally spits a few bars on her songs. Or when we see Grace, who gained more screen time due to charisma and creative outfits than actual talent.

Is that all women are for? To serve as entertainment?

And since we mentioned Miryo, it is relevant to say that even though, apparently, she was there because she wanted to, her presence on the show only serves to support the thesis that Unpretty Rapstar fails to help the cause of female union and empowerment. Kept in due proportion, Miryo is like Tymee (contestant on Unpretty Rapstar 1) and Gilme (contestant on Unpretty Rapstar 2): a talented and respected rapper with enough history to be on the position of a mentor, not a contestant.

Except for Yoon Mirae (who’s au concour in any discussion about female Korean rappers) and some underground legends such as Choi Sam, Rimi, and Sleeq, almost every female rapper with considerable notoriety in Korea has already been on Unpretty Rapstar. When you unite the majority of female talent as competitors, especially considering that these competitors will be judged mostly by men, what you’re saying is that you don’t have women talented enough to be on a position of power, which is false.

Let’s take the winner of Unpretty Rapstar 3 as an example. The very fact that Giant Pink was inserted into the show after being unfairly eliminated from Show Me the Money 5 is problematic.

Watching the cast of Unpretty Rapstar 3 performing on Show Me the Money 5 already gave viewers an idea of what was to come. Just like during Unpretty Rapstar 2, when Truedy got more bars on the group song and was favoured during the entire competition until she won, Giant Pink played a similar role in season 3 by receiving prominence on a performance featured on the same competition she was previously discarded by, as if they wanted people to be happy for her to be reigning on a female exclusive competition though she wasn’t “good enough” to make it in Show Me the Money. It continually reinforces the “you’re good for a girl” ideology; good enough for the girls, but not quite up against guys.


Also on KultScene: Which ‘Unpretty Rapstar’ Contestant Are You? [QUIZ]

And, of course, Giant Pink won, even though she failed multiple times during the competition.

What’s being questioned is not the contestants talent; that’s arbitrary. Both Truedy and Giant Pink are very competent rappers, but the main thing is that it is hard to believe Unpretty Rapstar 3 didn’t intend for Giant Pink to come out as the winner since the beginning. The whole scenario suggests that she would only be able to succeed as long as she did not try to be as good as a man.

The same could be said about Ash-B, a fierce girl with amazing flow who also got eliminated early on on Show Me the Money 5 for no perceptible reason, that she was a woman. She later got reinserted into the third season of Unpretty Rapstar after failing during the second season. This time, Ash-B did much better and went much farther on the competition. But the concerning remains: if she is so qualified, why didn’t they let her show all this talent in a competition that is supposed to be for rappers of any gender?

It doesn’t help at all that women can only get attention when they are seen competing against each other. Instead of criticizing women, we should be asking ourselves why is it that they cannot get appropriate opportunities to showcase their work outside of the little arena in media designed for females only?

With that said, the benefits gained from participating in Unpretty Rapstar can’t be ignored. It got Cheetah and Yezi to be featured as judges in another rap show; KittiB signed with Brand New Music, being now the only female solo act amongst names like Verbal Jint, San E, and P-Type; Heize got an all-kill on music charts with her single “Star” in Dec. 2016; Jessi’s career finally took off after more than 10 years in the business. Those achievements certainly would have been less likely to happen if those ladies hadn’t been on the show.

Will women in Korean rap ever have the respect and success they deserve? Will they be put in spotlight in situations different than forcefully battling their congenial or serving as entertainment? We sure do hope so. While we wait to see about a fourth season, we can surely say that 2017 has potential to be a better year for female rappers and that’s, in a way, thanks to Unpretty Rapstar.

What are your thoughts on Unpretty Rapstar’s portrayal of female rappers? Share your thoughts in the comment section below and be sure to subscribe to the site and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr to keep up with all of our posts.

2016 Gift Guide For Lovers of K-Pop, K-Drama, & K-Beauty

KultScene 2016 Holiday gift guide feat TWICE!It seems like the holiday season already began as far back as September, but for many of KultScene’s readers it kicks off in earnest on Thanksgiving day when the Black Friday sales jump into action in the US (and much of the rest of the world!) Every year, we’ve greeted the busiest shopping season of the year with our K-pop-oriented gift guide and once again we’ve put our heads together and come up with some great ideas.

Albums and K-pop swag may be a lot of fun (all the lightsticks and posters!!) for the music fans, and you may be tempted to see if that drama you know they love is available on Amazon, but there’s so much more out there! Along with our recommendations, we’re offering a few discounts and giveaways throughout the next month, so make sure to check back throughout the holiday season!

Scroll below to see our rotating giveaways. Currently we’re giving away a Korea Curated Box, so scroll down to enter!

For The Masking Fiend

There’s a lot of K-beauty-oriented subscription boxes out there (and on this gift guide), but Piibu Subscription Box is the answer to every masker’s dreams. If you know someone who has ever tried the 10 masks in 10 days challenge, Piibu’s box filled with different masks is perfect for that. The monthly subscription box comes with a variety of masks from different Korean brands.

Price: $19-108, depending on the subscription plan

Piibu is offering KultScene readers a chance to win a box, so enter below (begins at midnight 11/24). However, this is only available for those in the US, sorry!

Update: Thanks to everyone who entered our Piibu giveaway! Congratulations Naomi Pangelinan for winning!

For People Who Love Wearing Their Fandom Hearts on Literal Sleeves

Everyone loves T-shirts, right? TeePublic gives artists an opportunity to sell their designs for $20, and there are some really great K-pop themed ones available through the outlet so just dig around a bit. We’re fans of designs by sittinginclover and dekoreate, but there’s a lot more K-related items on the site. The site is called TEEPublic, but you can also get the designs on a variety of items, like cell phone cases and mugs!

sittinginclover Super Junior-inspired "Oppa" Tee

Price: Tees for $20

For the K-pop Inept

Just in case someone in your life is completely lacking all knowledge of Korea’s music industry, Woosung Kang’s recently released The KPop Dictionary is probably a good place to start. Or, you know, take a look at our other fact-finding suggestions.

K-Pop Dictionary

Price: $6 for Kindle version, $13 for paperback copy


Also on KultScene: 2015 Gift Guide For Fans Of Korean Pop Culture

For The Skin Tone Perfectionist

For some people, sunscreen is all you need before leaving the house. For others, you better have your primer, foundation, powder, and setting spray. Most of us are somewhere in between. Missha makes it pretty easy, with their BB Boomer primer setting things up as a great base for whatever you’re dressing your face up with. (Plus, Alexis swears by their Time Revolution Essence!). Everything on Missha’s site is 30% OFF between Dec. 1-27 and there’s a lot of free gifts, including sheet masks and samples of some of their Time Revolution products.

Make sure to enter our Missha X KultScene giveaway! We’re giving three winners a gift set worth $90 featuring the BB Boomer, Missha’s Time Revolution Night Repair Science Activator AmpouleTime Revolution The First Treatment Essence. However, only U.S. residents can participate since the prizes must be sent to an address within the country.

misha-bb-boomer-kultscene

Price: Regular $15, but on sale for $9

Thanks to everyone who entered our Missha giveaway! The winners have been notified.

For The Lipstick Loving EXO-Ls

Apparently, Sephora has shades in their Rouge Cream Lipstick line that sound suspiciously like they were named after songs by EXO, like “Call Me Baby” and “Lucky One.” It may or may not be related, but it’s a nice little token with an inside joke for anyone who wants a piece of K-pop in their makeup bag. [Let KultScene know if you find any other K-pop connections at Sephora!]

Sephora Lucky One EXO lipstick KultScene

Lucky One

Price: $12.50 each

For The Lipstick Loving Wino

No, I don’t mean a fan of WINNER (shout out to Inner Circle!). Style Korean has a lot of really cute products, but our favorite is their Labiotte Wine Tints. Or just buy them some soju or plum wine!

 

Price: $9 each

For The K-pop Fan Always Losing Their Headphones

Psy apparently tested these adorable brightly colored earbuds from Soul Electronics. So if that celebrity endorsement matters to you, here you go! They come in a variety of different neon hues so can suit just about anyone’s taste. (And maybe buy an album or two with them?)

kpop_product_shot_pink

Price: $50

For The K-Beauty Confused

What the heck is the 10 step solution? If your giftee, or yourself, are befuddled by the nuances of K-beauty skincare, the BomiBox is the perfect place to begin. Each box comes with eight full or deluxe sized Korean beauty products, ensuring that you’ll have a diverse range of items to peruse as you dig further into K-beauty.

Bomibox KultScene

Price: $37, but if you use the code KULTSCENE you get $2 off each order you make. For life!

Thank you everyone for entering and congratulations, Briana Fortunato!


Also on KultScene: 2014 K-Pop Inspired Gift-Giving Guide

For The Cuddle Buddy

Zombie Mamma makes some adorable K-pop plushies, specialized upon request. So if you know someone who wants to be able to brag about sharing a bed with their favorite Korean star… Here’s your chance! Contact Zombie Mamma through her Facebook page.

Zombie Mamma K-pop plushies

Price: Prices range from $50-$60, depending on how elaborate you want to get with the hair, outfit, etc.

For The Burgeoning Anthropologist

K-beauty and K-pop is good and all, but is that really what Korea’s all about? Definitely not! Korea Curated and Inspire Me Korea are two different subscription boxes that bring a little bit of Korean culture straight to your front door.

Korea Curated offers subscription boxes featuring Korean items that aren’t typically sold outside of Korea. Each month’s box can feature anything and everything, filled with things such as Korean snacks, toys, artwork, socks, craft projects, and more. (Plus it’s run out of Korea by a married couple, Cory and Marie, which you know it’s filled with love!) If you use the code KULTSCENE, you’ll get 20% off your first order.

Korea Curated boxes KultScene gift guide

Price: $43-75, depending on the size of the box.

Inspire Me Korea, on the other hand, offers the most diverse Korean subscription boxes around with their monthly culture boxes geared to both men and women, plus they also feature a beauty box. It’s UK based, but don’t worry, they ship their boxes around the world. If you use the code KULTSCENE you can get 10% off your first order.

Inspire Me Korea Box KultScene Gift Guide

Price: £13.99-40 (about $18-100 USD), depending on the subscription

a Rafflecopter giveaway

For The Foodie

Watched Let’s Eat or Drinking Alone? There’s so much food, how can you not want to try some Korean food firsthand? We spoke to the women who started Crazy Korean Cooking years ago, but they have these DIY kits that we think would be a great addition to any kitchen pantry.

They also have a great option to get meals shipped directly to your door , and if you use the code KULTSCENE you can get 25% off your first order. Or, if you’re looking for something more stocking-sized, there’s also the A Very Crazy Korean Christmas Gift set filled with some fun items, ranging from food to kitchen gloves. (Literally!) If you’re interested in that, use the code KULTCRAZY to get 10% off. Both codes expire Dec. 18, so decide which delicious looking foodstuff you want soon!

DIY Crazy Korean Cooking

Price: $19-85

What’s your ideal holiday gift, either for yourself or for others? Share your thoughts (and pictures of your holiday shopping!) about this article in the comment section below and be sure to subscribe to the site and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr to keep up with all of our posts.

2015 Gift Guide For Fans Of Korean Pop Culture

EXO ChristmasWhile it seems like the holiday season begins earlier and earlier each year, the Friday after Thanksgiving is the traditional kickoff for those of us living in the United States. Some of you may have already started putting together your wish lists or have started shopping, but in case you are looking for some K-pop or K-drama inspired presents, KultScene has you covered with our 2015 gift guide.

For The K-Beauty Obsessed

Korean masks – $2-$25
This is perhaps the most obvious choice on the list when it comes to K-beauty lovers. Have your choice from any of the masks we tested out earlier this year. Seriously, there’s way too many options out there, so just have your go at whatever happens to catch your eye
Glass Nails$2
Glass nails are the biggest thing out of Korea since K-pop, and are the trend that we most have our eye on. It’s cheap, and fun, and a great small item to include in any gift basket.102615-korean-glass-nails-lead
Chosungah 22 Flavorful Lipstick in Guava Tint Jello – $18
This is not only a beautiful, well-lasting shade to color your lips with, but the lipstick looks like jello. It may look like jello, but don’t start eating it just because it’s flavored.  The Chosungah 22 product is also a lip balm and has a lot of vitamins to help keep lips smooth.

chosungah22_flavorfullipstick_guavatintjello_900x900 Colored Hair Dye – $7-$$ (drugstore versus professional)
Red, green, pink, blue, galaxy… What color hair do you think you or your loved one deserves to wear next year? Korean stars have surpassed the normal blondes, reds, and browns, and it’s now your turn to help someone get a new ‘do.
The Little Book of Skin Care by Charlotte Cho– $14
The Soko Glam founder published her book earlier this year, following the rise in popularity of K-beauty. This is the newest, most updated guide for getting that special beautiful Korean skin, and what we’re all hoping to get this season.

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Also on KultScene: K-Pop Inspired Gift-Giving Guide

For The Super K-Pop Fans

iTunes Gift Card – $10+
Don’t laugh. Nowadays, there’s Spotify and YouTube to listen to your favorite K-pop tunes on, but nothing beats owning a whole album the day it’s released and listening to it again and again and again.
YG Entertainment Apparel– $5+
This is perfect for any YG-stan out ther, or really anyone who likes some of K-pop’s biggest acts. YG Entertainment, one of South Korea’s largest entertainment agencies, recently started selling their merchandise directly to overseas consumers. Don’t miss out on your chance to get some of your own Big Bang or 2NE1 hoodies, CDs, or more.

Screen Shot 2015-11-27 at 1.33.48 AM
Concert Tickets – $50+
It’s every K-pop fan’s dream to see their favorite idols live. There have been more overseas concerts than ever before in 2015, and A Pink (U.S), INFINITE (U.S), and Beast (Australia) are just some of the few acts going outside of Asia in the near future. If you or anyone you know loves listening, dancing, singing, and breathing K-pop, tickets to a K-pop concert near (or far) is a good gift. Tickets vary in price, but the experience is priceless.
CDs & Concert DVDs – $20+
Even better than songs on your computer or phone are K-pop albums that you can hold and cherish for all eternity (or until you run out of space on your shelves.) K-pop CDs and other sorts of merchandise can be purchased on a variety of websites, so a quick Google search or Amazon search is  sure to turn up a lot of options. Or, if you live near a Korean community, check out their local bookstore and you may be surprised.

For The Fashion Gurus

Retro black chokers – $7
The 90’s are back in full force, and it began first in Korea before coming west earlier this year. The stylish black necklaces (recently seen on EXID) are back and you definitely want to get your hands on one before the trend goes back into the past.

IMG_20151110_220141
Beanies a la Siwon in “She Was Pretty” -$10
Anywhere you looked in the second half of the year, it was almost impossible to miss Super Junior’s Siwon being absolutely everywhere. One of his biggest roles was in the drama “She Was Pretty,” and, along with all of the ridiculousness of his character, came one really amazing orange beanie.
choi-siwon-feature
Flared Jeans – $30
Going back to our retro styles that are in, flared jeans join the high-waisted trend that have been in for a while now to great some sort of uber nostalgia jeans. You can get flared jeans from anywhere, but these cute ones from H&M are currently on sale and sure to make anyone look good.

hmprod


Also on KultScene: Questions We Have After The End of ‘Sassy Go Go’

For The Foodies

Maangchi’s Cookbook – $17
Want to learn how to cook authentic Korean food? Blogger and YouTuber chef Maangchi released her cookbook “Maangchi’s Real Korean Cooking: Authentic Dishes for the Home Cook” was released in May. So grab a copy and start cooking some of her mouth watering recipes.

maangchi
Dolsot pot – $38
If you’re looking for a real Korean cooking expereince, getting one of these authentic Korean stonewear pots is the way to go.

41uhDno350L

For The Readers

“A Geek In Korea $13
Daniel Tudor’s guide to Korea is a great intro to the country you may have been introduced to by K-pop and K-dramas. Here’s your chance to get an inside take on the whole world of Korean pop culture.

a geek in korea daniel tudor review book korean kpop korea
“In Real Life” – $13
Lawrence Tabak’s young adult novel is about E-games, a side of Korean pop culture that usually doesn’t come into contact with fans of Korean music, dramas, and films, but it is a major part of Korean society and a fun read.

in real life esports book tabak
“Hello, I Love You” – $14
Katie M. Stout’s debut novel is all about romance, cultural understanding, K-pop, and idols. What more is there to want?

hello-i-love-you

Happy holidays from KultScene!

What are you buying this season? Let us know in the comment section below and be sure to subscribe to the site and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr to keep up with all of our posts.

‘A Geek in Korea’ Provides A Glossy Overlook Of Modern South Korea [Review]

As far as guidebooks go, Daniel Tudor’s A Geek In Korea: Discovering Asian’s New Kingdom of Cool is probably one of the most interesting, insightful books a Korean-phile, or random tourist, could read, filled with information about South Korea’s culture, history, food, music, and more.

The book mixes glossy photos with paragraphs upon paragraphs of information. Tudor, who has lived in South Korea for several years, gives his own personal opinion about the best points of Korea and veers into commentary about Korean society from a foreigner’s perspective.

Some things are worth taking with a grain of salt as it is the author’s opinion, but Tudor has real insight on Korean culture. He doesn’t only highlight what is popular, but includes additional information, even an entire section, about what he personally would suggest seeing in Korea. As someone who has spent an extended period of time in Korea, he definitely offers a unique perspective.


 Also on KultScene: ‘The Technicians’ Is Korea’s Answer To Hollywood Heist Films

There are a lot of tidbits for anybody interested in Korean culture, ranging from information about dating culture to the history of Korea and how it ended up the way it is. By breaking the culture and country down into several informative chapters, A Geek In Korea touches on many different facets of society, including K-pop, the gaming industry, business, and daily life in general.

Tudor’s personal stories are entertaining and give a really good taste of what it is like living in South Korea as a foreigner. He calls a spade a spade, and includes some odd, slightly negative aspects of South Korea, but A Geek In Korea definitely balances out the bad with the overwhelmingly good aspects of Korea.

Quasi-information guide, quasi-tour book, Tudor also provides shopping advice and information about Seoul and the rest of South Korea without coming across as didactic as the average guide book tends to do. Tudor’s writing style comes across as both entertaining and informative, and is a pleasure to read. In fact, A Geek In Korea doesn’t even really read like a guidebook; as I was reading it, I had a hard time putting it down.


Also on KultScene: Fiestar & Sex in K-Pop

There were a few things that seemed a little bit extraneous, and some factual information was wrong (some photos were mislabeled, including one particular one naming a K-pop idol by the wrong name,) but overall A Geek In Korea provides exactly what it promises, a self-proclaimed geek’s guide to South Korea.

Interested in buying it? You can purchase it on Tuttle’s website where it is currently the cheapest, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and other book retailers.

Are you interested in reading the book? Have you read it? Share your thoughts in the comment section below and be sure to subscribe to the site and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr to keep up with all of our posts.

Cosmetic Hallyu: Glow Recipe Helps Understand Korean Skin Care

First thing’s first- cleanse, toner, serum, moisturizer. At least, that’s what Christine Chang, the co-founder of Glow Recipe, says is the secret to great skin. Based out of New York, Chang sat down with KultScene to discuss how their natural Korean products are exactly what everybody needs to get dewy, radiant skin.

Glow Recipe sells natural Korean facial products to international audiences. Rather than going for cutesy makeup, Chang and her fellow co-founder Sarah Lee carefully find the best skin care products in South Korea to bring to their audience. Everything that is sold on Glow Recipe is not only Korean, but also natural and good for your skin. And they don’t just sell anything that is popular in the Korean market. Glow Recipe’s staff carefully cultivates products for their audience and uses a multicultural panel of testers in order to match the multicultural U.S. market. Even though Glow Recipe is based in New York, the company has started shipping around the globe.

Why Korean beauty? Chang and Lee worked in the cosmetic industry for around ten years, and saw that a lot of innovation was coming out of Korea and that the people around them in both the industry and their personal lives were noticing. With their unique insight, having experience in both the U.S. and Korean beauty markets, the two started Glow Recipe to bring people the best that Korean technology, ingredients, and innovation can bring.

Also on KultScene: Fashion Spotlight: PushBUTTON

“Korea has a really long heritage of natural beauty, dating back to palace literature, and a lot of those [ingredients and remedies] are present here with natural makeup. And a lot of those [things] are present in Europe but they weren’t coming over to the U.S. We wanted to bring those over to the U.S. to bring people great brands and teach really good practices,” explained Chang.

Is it another part of the Korean wave, Hallyu? “I think it’s hard to separate culture and music and pop culture and celebrity from beauty because they talk about it and use it and their fans around the world hear it,” said Chang. “And, if anything, I think the products going forward, will have more integration with Korean celebrities, Korean dramas, it’s almost like a seamless package… I can only imagine what will happen going forward.” She brought up 2013-14’s Korean drama, My Love From The Star, which caused a lipstick craze that led to Yves Saint Laurent selling out of a color worldwide; Korean skin care isn’t far behind.

The primary differences between Korean and American beauty routine? In Korea, beauty and skin tone are closely connected. The goal of Glow Recipe isn’t to give your skin the matte look that is often desired by America, covering up with makeup; the goal of Korean beauty is to treat the skin, to make a radiant, dewy look even before applying any makeup. Korean women are willing to try just about anything to get beautiful skin, so Korean products are much more adventurous than what the American market is used to. Because of this, Korean skin care may be daunting. But Glow Recipe makes it easy for even a beginning.

Also on KultScene: Music Video Fashion: BEAST’s “Good Luck”

Many people may have seen the fabled Korean ten-step skin care routine, one of which is on Glow Recipe’s website, split between morning and evening regiments. “To us, core steps are the cleanser, the toner to prep and hydrate your skin. Then you have the serum, which is designed to penetrate deeply into your skin to treat the concern, and then there’s the moisturizer to seal it in. Those four things are essentials when we talk about a basic routine,” said Chang, regarding women’s daily routines. And for men? Exfoliating, because of stubble, and using SPF are key.

Chang also suggested that people take off your makeup like you would change into pajamas: As soon as you get home.

Along with the four steps, Christine Chang said that SPF is essential for daily use. Masks, essences, exfoliating ampoules, mists, etc. are also necessary for a regular routine, but hydrating and cleaning skin are the most important thing. Trying products for 4-6 weeks is also important, no matter how regularly you apply them, so that your skin goes through a whole cycle of renewal.

All this information might make us feel overwhelmed, but Glow Recipe makes the Korean skin care routine look easy with some links on their blog. I was so intrigued by Glow Recipe’s routine and products that Christine Chang showed me some things, and gave me a few testers to try at home. Having spent a half a year living in South Korea, I thought that I knew the Korean beauty industry. I was wrong. I tried out a sample of Glow Recipe’s products, and within a few days I noticed how the natural products were doing much better things for my skin than my normal products.

Here are some things that Glow Recipe suggested specifically for KultScene’s readers, all of which you can find at www.GlowRecipe.com.Glow Recipe also makes custom sample kits for its customers, so that you can try out whatever you’d like. Added bonus: Use the code KULTSCENEGLOW to get $5 off on your first Glow Recipe purchase.

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Do you use Korean facial products? What other Korean products would you like to learn about from KultScene? Share your thoughts in the comment section below and be sure to subscribe to the site and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr to keep up with all of our posts.